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HomeEducationFifty-two students promoted to next grade level at Daposka Ahnkodapi

Fifty-two students promoted to next grade level at Daposka Ahnkodapi

This is the first year students took standardized tests, thanks to a partnership with the Osage County Interlocal Cooperative

All 52 of the children attending Daposka Ahnkodapi, the Osage Nation’s Elementary School, were promoted to the next grade at a fun-filled ceremony featuring a handgame and Indian tacos on July 14.

Since the top grade for the school was the 5th grade, it will now add the 6th grade for the upcoming academic year. Ultimately, it will go through the 8th grade as its first class grows up.

School Superintendent Patrick Martin said that he is hoping to have a middle school separate from the elementary. The WahZhaZhe Early Learning Academy is moving into a new building and Daposka is hoping to inherit their old building and convert it into a middle school, he said.

For the first time, the Daposka students underwent standardized testing this past year, thanks to a partnership with the Osage County Interlocal Cooperative in Hominy. The test, called Aimsweb, is an online assessment, data management, and reporting system that provides national and local performance and growth norms for the screening and progress monitoring of math and reading skills for all students in Kindergarten through 8th grade. Test results showed that on average the children in Daposka were well above average in reading but slightly below average in math.

“The kids are not used to taking standardized tests, but the outcomes were very good with reading scores,” Martin said. “With Covid, they said everybody’s test scores were low.

“But their reading was great. We just have to keep working at math.”

According to a Brookings Institute study released in January on the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic and secondary education, academic normalcy has not yet returned to 2019 levels. In fact, across the country, math and reading scores for students in grades 3-8 had a “sizeable drop” in scores.

Daposka Ahnkodapi students play handgame on July 14 as part of their graduation celebrations. Courtesy Photo

Martin said that the ceremony was quite joyous because it was the first community event Daposka has held since the pandemic cast a dark cloud in early 2020. Earlier that day students enjoyed a day at the Sun and Fun water park in Ponca City, along with a pizza party.

“Everybody had a great time, everybody was excited and enthusiastic,” he said.

With additional reporting by Editor Shannon Shaw Duty

Author

  • Louise Red Corn

    Title: Reporter

    Email: louise.redcorn@osagenation-nsn.gov

    Twitter: @louiseredcorn

    Languages: English, Italian, rusty but revivable Russian

    Louise Red Corn has been a news reporter for 34 years and a photographer for even longer. She grew up in Northern California, the youngest child of two lawyers, her father a Pearl Harbor survivor who later became a state judge and her mother a San Francisco native who taught law at the University of California at Davis.

    After graduating from the U.C. Berkley with a degree in Slavic Languages and Literatures with no small amount of coursework in Microbiology, she moved to Rome, Italy, where she worked as a photographer and wordsmith for the United Nation’s International Fund for Agricultural Development, specializing in the French-speaking countries of Africa.

    When the radioactive cloud from Chernobyl parked over Rome in 1986, she escaped to New York City to work for the international editions of Time Magazine. She left Time for Knight-Ridder newspapers in Biloxi, Miss., Detroit and Lexington, Ky., During nearly 20 years with Knight-Ridder, she was a stringer (freelancer) for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and Parade Magazine.

    In 2004, she married Raymond Red Corn and moved to Oklahoma, where she worked for the Tulsa World before she bought the weekly newspaper in Barnsdall and turned a tired newspaper into the award-winning Bigheart Times, which she sold in 2018. She hired on at the Osage News in early 2022.

    Throughout her career she has won dozens of state, national and international journalism awards.

    Red Corn is comfortable reporting on nearly any topic, the more complex the better, but her first love is covering courts and legal issues. Her proudest accomplishment was helping to exonerate a Tennessee man facing the death penalty after he was wrongfully charged with capital murder in Kentucky, a state he had never visited.

Louise Red Corn
Louise Red Cornhttps://osagenews.org

Title: Reporter

Email: louise.redcorn@osagenation-nsn.gov

Twitter: @louiseredcorn

Languages: English, Italian, rusty but revivable Russian

Louise Red Corn has been a news reporter for 34 years and a photographer for even longer. She grew up in Northern California, the youngest child of two lawyers, her father a Pearl Harbor survivor who later became a state judge and her mother a San Francisco native who taught law at the University of California at Davis.

After graduating from the U.C. Berkley with a degree in Slavic Languages and Literatures with no small amount of coursework in Microbiology, she moved to Rome, Italy, where she worked as a photographer and wordsmith for the United Nation’s International Fund for Agricultural Development, specializing in the French-speaking countries of Africa.

When the radioactive cloud from Chernobyl parked over Rome in 1986, she escaped to New York City to work for the international editions of Time Magazine. She left Time for Knight-Ridder newspapers in Biloxi, Miss., Detroit and Lexington, Ky., During nearly 20 years with Knight-Ridder, she was a stringer (freelancer) for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and Parade Magazine.

In 2004, she married Raymond Red Corn and moved to Oklahoma, where she worked for the Tulsa World before she bought the weekly newspaper in Barnsdall and turned a tired newspaper into the award-winning Bigheart Times, which she sold in 2018. She hired on at the Osage News in early 2022.

Throughout her career she has won dozens of state, national and international journalism awards.

Red Corn is comfortable reporting on nearly any topic, the more complex the better, but her first love is covering courts and legal issues. Her proudest accomplishment was helping to exonerate a Tennessee man facing the death penalty after he was wrongfully charged with capital murder in Kentucky, a state he had never visited.

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